Are police responsible for Isla Vista shooting massacre?

Balcony of one of 10 crime scenes in Isla Vista shooting rampage.  (Photo Credit:  David McNew/Getty Images)

Balcony of one of 10 crime scenes in Isla Vista shooting rampage. (Photo Credit: David McNew/Getty Images)

Time and time again, we hear stories of mass shootings and wonder why no one in the perpetrator’s circle saw any signs of trouble.  If they did see signs, why did no one care enough to report these signs to someone who could help?  CNN is reporting today that the Isla Vista killing of multiple innocent people last week had been carefully planned over the past few years and there were many close calls that could have derailed the scheme.

There were more than enough red flags and, sadly, some of the blame must be squarely placed on the shoulders of those charged to protect and to serve…the police.  To be fair, the police probably get tips all day, every day about this or that.  And often they might have to make decisions on whether to give priority to a robbery in progress (potentially saving lives now) or to a tip called in by a concerned family member about a relative exhibiting odd behavior (potentially saving lives in the future).

Sadly the mass slaughtering of innocent people by Elliot Rodger, 22, was a tragedy that could have been prevented.  (Continue reading full story here.)

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , ,

5 Responses to “Are police responsible for Isla Vista shooting massacre?”

  1. lwk2431 Says:

    “Are police responsible for Isla Vista shooting massacre?”

    Ultimately no, at least legally. The Supreme Court has ruled numerous times that the police are not responsible for protecting individuals.

    lwk

    • Pamela Kay Noble Brown Says:

      Thank you for commenting Iwk2431. I understand your point, but I also still believe that the authorities must become more proactive, especially when the family hands them a possible killer on a platter.

      • lwk2431 Says:

        In the killer’s “manifesto” that he left behind we find out that he was in therapy since he was eight years old. We also find that he had been prescribed a medicine for schizophrenia which is a very dangerous mental illness where the person can lose all touch with reality (which probably explains his views on women ).

        But he didn’t take the medicine. Not following up and being sure he did take them might constitute medical malpractice. It is fairly routine I think for practitioners in the mental health field to use blood or urine tests (whichever is appropriate for the medicine) to insure the meds are being taken. With such a dangerous diagnosis I fail to understand why this didn’t happen.

        His parents knew of his increasing violent ideation but they must not have told the police about some things, and probably did not get the medical practitioner in the conversation.

        I feel fairly confident that if the doctor had told the police that he was schizophrenic and not taking medicine combined with his parents fears they might have done something and taken him off the street.

        There are the means for pro-active actions and they were available here. But the responsible people did not act responsibly in my view.

        regards,

        lwk

  2. Pamela Kay Noble Brown Says:

    “I feel fairly confident that if the doctor had told the police that he was schizophrenic and not taking medicine combined with his parents fears they might have done something and taken him off the street.”

    Iwk, I hope you are right. And I hope that we as a society will learn from these tragic situations and the proper pro-active actions will be taken to avert them being repeated.

  3. lwk2431 Says:

    “I hope that we as a society will learn from these tragic situations and the proper pro-active actions will be taken to avert them being repeated.”

    As I see it, many are focusing on the gun, and not the failure to identify and treat this individual suffering from a devastating mental illness. That is the problem with people not really looking at the circumstances but trying to fit them into their preconceived ideologies. We are all guilty. But I do believe we do have the ability to learn, eventually.

    regards,

    lwk

Your thoughts?

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: